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Facebook Archives - Duo Marketing Group

Facebook Archives - Duo Marketing Group

Cyber Bullying: More Than Just an Elementary School Problem

Posted by | Facebook, Food for thought, Social Media, Technology, Uncategorized | No Comments

Social media can a wonderful tool for connecting communities and spreading news. But there is also vicious side to it that has been on the rise.  Cyberbullying can be a difficult term to define. The definition includes mean messages or threats, spreading rumors, posting hurtful things online, sexting, or taking unflattering pictures and spreading them around through social media. It can be damaging to teens and adolescents and can lead to anxiety, depression, and even suicide. Over half of adolescents have been bullied online in some form or another. We understand the seriousness of this issue and are grateful to see lawmakers making progress to stop these types of hate crimes.

But, teens aren’t the only ones who are suffering.

According to a survey on the subject by the Pew Research Center, nearly 75 percent of American adults have witnessed online harassment with 40 percent seeing the brunt of that cyberbullying. If you take a look at any news story, public post, or image shared on Facebook, you are likely to see the same immature, disrespectful, mean language you might expect to come from a teenager, but this time it’s from adults.

For example:

Patrice Bendig recently wrote an article about her online dating experience that went viral on Facebook, being liked or shared over 30K times. At first, she later wrote, the comments were positive. But then, comments like the following started to roll in:

Instead of getting on a roller coaster she needs to get on a treadmill”

“You like Hulu with your cat, and….Muppets. Your over weight and dress like a PTA mom from Kansas. And you wonder why you are having trouble getting dates? Is this like some performance art piece?”

“Sorry to be honest but overweight, unflattering pics, generic profile with homebody interests, seemingly low self esteem, and a pet cat? There’s so many more choices for men in any metro area who have some game, I guess you need to lower your standards or move to a place where there’s less competition?”

“From the look of her, big-girl panties is an appropriate description”

“Yeah, guys who don’t like fat entitled girls are dumb.”

“The reality is – you’re fat. Doesn’t matter how great your personality or cat is. No one wants to deal with an unfit person headed for knee and back problems, diabetes and heart disease. You’re as bad a risk for a mate as you are for health insurance.”

Nobody deserves to hear or read things like this. Yet somehow, the semi-anonymity of Facebook and online comment sections have given people “permission” to say terribly unkind things.

So why do people do it? Why would anyone write something mean and click “post?” Psychologists have found that the lack of face-to-face communication in social media decreases empathy. A study published in August 2015 in the journal “Computers in Human Behavior” showed that cyberbullies typically have three personality traits that often occur together. These traits are called the “Dark Triad”: Machiavellianism, which is a tendency to manipulate other people for their own good; narcissism, an obsession with self and feeling that they are better than other people; and psychopathy, an attribute that includes a lack of empathy and a greater tendency to take risks. This dangerous combination can lead people to do things online that they wouldn’t do in person.

So, what can you do about it?

If you are a victim of merciless comments or harassment online, it’s best to ignore the perpetrator. Responding may add fuel to their fire and encourage them to keep going. Next, block, report, and flag any and all content from the cyber bully. Don’t delete the evidence permanently. Reporting the content instead of simply deleting it sends a strong statement that you won’t accept this type of internet behavior. It also allows the social media site to review the content and can help them either deactivate an account or block a person from a page.

Check your state laws to see if the police should get involved. In many situations, if the perpetrator is ignored, the bullying will stop.

If you see cyberbullying happening, post something positive and stand up for the person being bullied. Be the positive voice. “It is a powerful show of support to the victim and of rebuke to the bully,” says Michelle Ferrier, an associate dean for innovation at the Scripps College of Communication at Ohio University.

In conclusion, we love this quote from cyberbullying.org:

“In sum, it can be difficult to hold bullies accountable for their actions (for both adolescents and adults).  In a country such as ours that values free speech so highly, many people genuinely believe they can say whatever they want, to whomever they want.  We know that is not true, but it isn’t clear where exactly the line is.  And just because we can say certain things, doesn’t mean we should.  It’s no wonder that many teens are wrestling with this problem—they see the adults in their lives saying mean and nasty things to others on a regular basis. Do your part to model appropriate behavior and address any hurtful language when it comes up.  The kids (and other adults) in your life will hopefully see it, remember it, and act in the right ways.”

 

 

Social Media Resolutions for the New Year

Posted by | Business Tips, Facebook, Food for thought, Marketing Help, Social Media | No Comments

resolutions

As we approach the new year, we’ve discussed a lot about how we can improve – both for our own social marketing and for the clients we represent. Since social media is constantly changing, we do our best to adapt and improve as the changes come. So, these resolutions really are things we’ve already started to work on this year and have seen great benefits. Since we already know how beneficial they can be, we’re gearing up to take them to the next level in 2017.

We’re resolving to:

  • Rock at video. An estimated 74% of internet traffic is to come from video in 2017. And we’ve known for a while that video typically ranks the highest in social media algorithms. This year, we’re going to up our video game.
  • Blog like it’s our business. (Because, actually, it is.) We experience a bit of the “Cobbler’s Kids” syndrome around here – you know how they don’t have any shoes? We sometimes let our blog fall through the cracks while we’re developing epic content for our clients. But we’ve learned that treating our own brand like a client helps us to balance that out and invest quality time into generating our own content.
  • Add a personal touch. Social media research has consistently shown that images with faces in them tend to get more engagement than other images. Our goal is to put more of a focus on this as we’re developing content next year.
  • Improve our live video strategy. As part of upping our video game, we’re going to develop a great live video/Instagram stories strategy. Studies are predicting that less time and money will be spent on cable networks and more of that time will be spent watching live videos.
  • Separate social presence from social advertising. We’re of the belief that a great social marketing strategy includes maintaining a social presence (not specifically as an advertising effort) in addition to your strategic advertising efforts. Social media is built to be social. Our goal is to figure out how to effectively make these two elements of social marketing separate strategies that are built to work together.

#foodandfeelings

Posted by | Facebook, Food for thought, Fun Stuff, Marketing Help | No Comments

Today we’re talking about #foodandfeelings. Because who doesn’t want to talk about food and feelings, right?

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Throughout history, food has been a social experience. When was that last time you went to a party without food? Right?

Our friends in South Korea are a great example of this. They eat meals with their families regularly. Did you know the word for family in Korean literally means “those who eat together”? Food is a tradition. It pulls at our heartstrings and creates nostalgia. Posts about food on social media are wildly successful for that very reason. Instagram is where most food posts were first seen. It didn’t take long for Facebook to catch up, with hundreds of video posts about the next unimaginably delicious recipe!

So how can we incorporate #foodandfeelings to non-food related businesses and products? This is a question we ask ourselves often for the various clients we work with.

If we recognize that the success of those posts is found in the tradition, nostalgia, and feelings they provoke, we have to brainstorm what will create similar emotional ties with our own consumers.

That’s our challenge to you! Consider what emotional ties your business offers its consumers and use those ties to create meaningful relationships.

 

Social Media Safety: What NOT to Post

Posted by | Business Tips, Facebook, Food for thought, Privacy, Social Media | No Comments

Friends Connection Digital Devices Technology Network Concept

Social media is a great place to keep up on current events and reconnect with friends. We all enjoy the cute dog pictures and delicious recipes that fill our news feed, but there are a few things that may not be appropriate to post for the world to see. We suggest that you think twice before posting any of these:

  1. Vacation photos while you are ON vacation: You might as well post “I’m out of town come rob my house” when you post these. People see your beautiful beach toes and can put two-and-two together. To protect your home from unwanted guests, post the pictures once you are home.
  2. Naked Baby Pictures: They are cute, but be careful. There are weirdos out there that might use your child’s picture in harmful ways.
  3. Pictures of other people’s kids: Some people don’t want their kids all over social media. It’s better to respect their privacy, so unless you have their permission, don’t post a picture of their kiddos.
  4. “Check-In’s”: Facebook rolled out this feature in 2010 which allowed you to post exactly where you are at any given time. It might be fun, but it’s another open way for people to either see that you’re not home, or to stalk you in other ways – if you like this feature, we suggest checking in as you’re leaving the restaurant or other location. That way, you can still say you were there, without letting people know when. Don’t do this for places you frequent like, you know, your home.
  5. Personal addresses: Never post anything that can lead a stalker to your neighborhood. For instance, when your friends are engaged and invite you to post your addresses in a Facebook group, it’s better to share that information in a private message. We want to believe that everyone in that group has good intentions, but you can’t always trust that they won’t use your address for inappropriate things.
  6. Anything tied to your social security: Hopefully, this is a no-brainer. Don’t post your credit card information, maiden name, phone number, or anything else that can be tied to your social security card. There are people out there that will do anything they can to steal your identity.

We love social media and want you to have a safe, enjoyable experience online. What are other tips you’ve learned for staying safe on social media?

 

Getting Personal | Facebook Privacy : Photos

Posted by | Facebook, Privacy | No Comments

Facebook is an amazing tool that allows us to make connections with new acquaintances and stay connected to friends and family. What happens when our privacy is violated though?

Today, we’re going to get down to the nitty-gritty about protecting your personal photos.

Unfortunately, not everything (or everyone) on Facebook is all good. Fraudulent accounts are becoming more and more common.  These people will take your personal photos and use them as their own against your knowledge. The experience of having your photos exploited in this way can be disheartening and frustrating. This is why it is important to make sure your photos are protected. So what can you do?

Facebook designates some photo albums as public and allows you to set some albums as private. When an album is a Facebook designated public album, you can still manage the privacy of each photo individually. Profile Picture albums and Cover Photo albums are automatically public. When you go into these albums, you can click on the settings gear to see an explanation of your options for photo privacy (as shown below):

screen-shot-2016-09-08-at-2-26-10-pm

 

So, while the album itself is public, you can change the audience for any profile pictures except your current one. You’ll just need to go to the picture you’d like to make private, check the audience, and make the change. In the following example, you’ll see that my photo was set to public. When I clicked on the drop down, I was given the option to allow friends to see this photo or to make it visible only to me (this can be a helpful option for private photos of your children, or for images of special experiences that you’d like to have stored somewhere, but not visible to everyone).

screen-shot-2016-09-08-at-2-28-04-pm

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Any albums that you have created can be changed at the album level in the same way you changed the individual photos above: by clicking the dropdown menu and selecting the appropriate audience.

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I would recommend doing a quick Facebook “clean up” to make sure that all of your photos are being seen by the people you’ve approved to see them.

 

If you ever find yourself in a position where your photos are being used fraudulently, there are reporting capabilities that you can take advantage of. Facebook will usually respond quickly, but it can be a stressful process, best avoided by taking action now. We hope this never becomes a problem for you. We want to make Facebook a safe and enjoyable experience for everyone – businesses and individuals alike!

 

Let’s talk about the Facebook Updates

Posted by | Business Tips, Facebook, Social Media | No Comments

“Overall, we anticipate that this update may cause reach and referral traffic to decline for some Pages. The specific impact on your Page’s distribution and other metrics may vary depending on the composition of your audience. For example, if a lot of your referral traffic is the result of people sharing your content and their friends liking and commenting on it, there will be less of an impact than if the majority of your traffic comes directly through Page posts. We encourage Pages to post things that their audience are likely to share with their friends. As always, Pages should refer to our publishing best practices.”

– Lars Backstrom in a recent post on Facebook Newsroom: http://newsroom.fb.com/news/2016/06/news-feed-fyi-helping-make-sure-you-dont-miss-stories-from-friends/

There you have it – straight from the metaphorical Facebook horse’s mouth. The new update will likely cause a decline in reach and referral traffic for pages. But, 
we’re not worried. Here’s why:

  1. We’ve always said “social media is meant to be social”. Meaning businesses and brands should be creating content people want to share – not just telling people to buy your product or come into your location. Keeping your content social, engaging, and sharable is now important for two reasons: One – the more your audience shares your posts, the more your audience will grow. Two – we believe that creating a relationship with your potential customers encourages sales, etc. more than directly asking your followers to buy ever will.
  2. We’ve got a sneaking suspicion that at least part of the reason Facebook makes these changes is to please their shareholders. So, yes, that means that you’ve got to pay Facebook to keep your content visible. But, that’s nothing new. We’ve been paying Facebook advertising dollars for a while now – long enough to tell you that Facebook is good at pleasing the brands that are paying them too. The combination of great content + targeted advertising dollars is a great recipe for success.
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